Many whales wash up dead on Florida beach

One of the washed up whales 
By: Shira Schockett 

(Scroll down for video) They came out of nowhere. All of a sudden many whales just washed up on a South Florida Beach, according to the news media.

Despite the best efforts of the volunteers and staff, only five whales survived after a group of at least 22 whales were stranded on the southern coast of Florida this weekend.

The herd of 22 whales was discovered in Avalon Beach Park in Florida on Saturday morning from young to adult whales.
No one knows why they beached, but Allison Garrett, a spokesman for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration or NOAA told the news media that "Pilot whales are very social animals.

One scenario might be one of the animals were sick. They are not going to leave a sick whale behind. They stay together." Blair Mase, NOAA's stranding coordinator told the news media, "If they move in the water, they just keep coming back and stranding themselves again."

Hundreds of residents joined state and federal officials in mounting a massive rescue operation that lasted all day Saturday. They tried to keep the whales upright to help them breathe and skin covered with wet towels and pouring water on them, but at night, only five of the whales, could be saved. They were taken to a nearby rehabilitation center.

Volunteer Charleen Alioto, drove almost two hours to help the rescue effort, saying "We grabbed our buckets and we arrived. But as soon as I arrived I saw it was too late to help."

Officials saidthat 17 whales died from natural causes or had to be euthanized humanely. "It has not been possible to send them to rehabilitation," an official told the news media.

An activist told the news media that, "I think people want to help animals, especially whales and dolphins, as they are our partners in the seas. They are mammals, are smart and are social. They are much like us.”

Mobile video not loading? Click here to view


comments powered by Disqus