CVS caught refilling drugs without approval

CVS branch  
By: John Roberts  

Some pharmacists at CVS, the nation's second largest pharmacy chain, were replenishing prescriptions and filed insurance claims without the approval of patients.

The strange possibly illegal practice was detailed in confidential emails sent this year by a CVS pharmacy supervisor to dozens of pharmacists under his control.

The emails make it clear that an internal quota existed for prescription refills, with at least 30 percent of calls to patients about medications are expected in return business. A threat of major personnel changes

are made to pharmacists who could not reach their quota.

"You have to go out and make it happen this week and every week in the future," said Ryan Barna, a CVS supervisor in an email. He oversees about 50 pharmacists in the area of New Jersey.

CVS recognizes that the emails were legitimate and that the prescriptions may have been processed without patients’ approval. But the company says this is an example of an isolated overzealous manager, not a practice of CVS pharmacists nationwide.

"It is not our policy to refill prescriptions without patient authorization," Mike DeAngelis, a spokesman for CVS said.