New York doctor finally cures woman's 20 year headache

By: Sarah Weiss 

A woman struggling with headaches for 20 years straight has finally found some relief, according to reports.

For nearly 20 years, Stephanie Bross struggled with debilitating headaches.

"I had a headache almost every day, and the only change was the intensity whether it was a kind of a low profile I was able to walk around with or severe one," Bross, 49, who lives in Long Island, New York said.

Bross, who has two children, tried multiple medications, changed her diet and even went to physical therapy. The doctors had no answer for her. Last year, the headaches became so bad, she would lose her balance. After breaking her ankle, Bross realized she had to get to the root of the problem.

She went to Dr. Larry Newman at the Institute of headache in Roosevelt Hospital in New York, a decision she said has changed her life. "I left with a prescription for a drug that I vaguely heard of before, and filled it, took it and it immediately started working, Bross said, laughing.

"It literally started working on the first dose." Newman prescribed indomethacin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory or NSAID, used to treat moderate to severe pain, usually caused by arthritis.

So why did it take so long for Bross to find relief? Newman said the rare type of headache suffered by Bross is often misdiagnosed. Hemicrania continua is a rare type of headache that does not stop. Patients are often diagnosed with migraine because some of the symptoms are very similar.