Ford to stop installing CD players in cars in order to save fuel

Car with no CD player 
By: Debbie Gross 

CD players could become the next victim of the struggle to shed weight of cars in the name of fuel efficiency.

In an interview, Ford designer Michael Arbaugh, said he was "looking forward to the day" when the designers will get rid of the CD player from car dashboards, forever.

The reason is simple, the CD player weighs 2.2 kilograms, especially when taking into account the CD that is put inside the player, and the weight has a direct impact on fuel efficiency of modern cars.

A few years ago, it may not have mattered much, but in a world where high gas prices have become the norm and the environmental agenda is more prominent than ever, manufacturers are entertaining new ideas of how to get rid of weight. They are also aware that CDs are becoming a device of the past.

"I think anyone under 30-years-old is probably using MP3 devices. They do not buy CDs," Arbaugh said.
This consideration is likely to accelerate the movement of the car manufacturers to eliminate physical media players from their cars, which means we could be witnessing the death of the CD much quicker than we saw the death of the recorder.

Last year, Ford released several CD player free European Ford Focus cars, considering that 95 percent of buyers chose the model with free versions of MP3 devices and 90 percent opted for a Bluetooth wireless connection.

Chevrolet Sonic RS also introduced an optical drive for MyLink, allowing access to MP3 and streaming music from sites like Pandora.
Earlier this year, a research firm predicted that about 331,000 cars were sold with no CD player in the United States so far this year. The firm estimated that the figure will jump to 12.1 million cars by 2018.