Utility charges homeowner for nearby street lights for 25 years

Street light illustratio 
By: Eva Fett 

(Scroll down for video) Everyone knows that electricity is expensive these days. One homeowner was also charged for powering the street lights nearby.

Connecticut Light & Power has now refunded almost $10,500 to one woman after admitting that her bill for the past 25 years included the electricity used to power street lights near her home.

Grace Edwards spoke about how she discovered the billing error after a potential buyer for her house in Cheshire called for a history of the utility charges.

The cost included line items for "Lumen 9500 HP sodium" and "HP Sodium 6300 Lumen" or two sodium vapor lamps.
When asked about the charges, Connecticut Light & Power said a developer, who previously owned the house, had agreed to pay for street lighting.

The company dropped the charges on her bill, but refused to reimburse her past cost. She said that she relented when the State Office of Consumer Counsel became involved.

"I called CL & P, wrote letters, did it all, but they did not respond to anything," she said. "I really thought I was going to have to sue CL & P," she said.

The CL & P spokesman, Mitch Gross, said the company has acknowledged that the service was below standard, and the company has apologized for the mistake and inconvenience.

"We have refunded the amount that was billed incorrectly with interest and will use this case as a learning experience to identify processes and improve customer service, to make sure this never happens again in the future," said Gross.

The company cut Edwards a check for $10,491.21, which is about $35 per month for the overcharges. The company said the original charges for the street lights were about $5,800, which is about $19 a month.