O'Hare airport in Chicago Illinois looking for hungry goats

Goats in airport property illustration 
By: Ryan Lee Hall 

There is a lot of food in Chicago, Illinois, for goats and sheep.

The Chicago Aviation Authority is looking for at least two dozen hungry goats to eat weeds near its O'Hare International Airport.

About 100 acres of land around the second-busiest airport in the country after Atlanta, have become overgrown with grass and weeds, which are attracting birds that are hazardous to the aircraft.

The terrain is difficult to access with heavy mowing machines, so the decision was made to seek a solution for the animals to eat the foliage, aviation spokesperson Amy Malick said.

"We can use sheep, goats or any grazing animal. We do not discriminate," Malick said.
So far, the authority has heard from five candidates, who wish to bring their cattle to the airport perimeter.

As part of the agreement, the company who wins the contract, will also provide for portable fences to stop the animals from leaving the area, Malick said.

Earlier last week, goats and sheep were deployed around Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, where they chewed away nonnative invasive, fast-growing species of plants, according to the report.