U.S. government sells family poisonous home

The Hankins family at their new home 
By: Eva Fett 

The U.S. government sold an unsuspecting family a poisonous home, which got them all very sick, according to reports.

The foreclosed home for sale on an up-and-coming street longed for some fresh paint and other corrections, but the Hankins family saw its potential.

Moreover, at $36,000 the price was perfect for a young family trying to make a living in the small town of Klamath Falls, Oregon.

"We said, 'It needs a little love, but it has good bones,'" recalled Jonathan Hankins. "We just had no idea that those bones were poisonous," he said.

Within days of moving in last summer, Beth Hankins, an ER nurse, began experiencing breathing problems. Then, Jonathan got migraine headaches and nosebleeds. By the third week, her 2-year-old son, Ezra, developed mouth ulcers.

"He could not even drink water without being in pain," said Jonathan, 32.

They were about to schedule visits to the doctor when a neighbor shared the bad news: 2427 Radcliffe was a former meth house.

The family requested a test kit for $50 and that the laboratory accelerate the results, which revealed contamination levels nearly 80 times above the limits of the Oregon Health Authority.

"Our walls were poisoning us," said Jonathan, who quickly moved with his family to a rented house.

Buying a foreclosure house from government-sponsored Freddie Mac meant the family was informed about being responsible for detecting hazards like lead paint and asbestos, but there was no warning from Realtors or Freddie Mac on drug activity.

Because it was sold "as is," the couple decided to save their money and not spend for a traditional inspection, which usually identifies some issues but not superficial repairs or chemicals used to cook the highly addictive drug.

"This is the case of methamphetamine, which is an invisible toxin," said Jonathan.