Debt collector tells disabled army vet he should have died

Holding cash illustration 
By: Anika Rao 

A man was told by a debt collector that he should have died, according to a lawsuit.

A disabled Army veteran claims that a law firm told him he "should have died" instead of collecting disability payments.

Michael Collier and his wife, Kim Collier-Dingman, living in Maricopa County, Arizona, claims that the Gurstel Chargo law company and debt collection agency, which has offices in Minnesota, Iowa and Arizona, engaged in "deceptive, unfair and abusive" practices after a judge's ruling that the company illegally seized their funds, according to court documents filed last week in U.S. District Court of Arizona.

The couple and their lawyer, Floyd Bybee, who could not be reached for comment, are claiming that the company violated the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, which prohibits harassment or abuse in the collection of a debt.

In April, the company collected $6,143 from their savings account after Collier defaulted on a student loan after he suffered spinal injuries and head injuries while serving in the U.S. Army, according to court documents.