Charity organization rescues food from dumpsters

Dumpster illustration 
By: Aarav Sen 

(Scroll down for video) While some call it dumpster diving others call it "rescuing food."

Supermarkets and produce growers want to sell only the best of the best of food, so what happens to food they deem less than perfect to sell, but are still perfectly edible? They are thrown into the garbage.

Some people have saved a lot of money by going to the dumpsters of these supermarkets and farms to collect the discarded food.

According to a study, U.S. residents throw away $165 billion dollars worth of food each year, which breaks down to about 20 pounds per person each month, that includes what people throw away at home, restaurants, grocery stores and farms.

One woman shows how she takes home perfectly good food thrown out by supermarkets. After opening a bag of garbage the woman found a warm loaf of bread amongst other good food.

One organization goes to farms and they collect the leftover harvest, which they then distribute it free to the poor.

Last year, Northern Illinois Food Bank recovered 12 million pounds of perfectly edible food that was
headed for the garbage. Retailer could not sell the items sometimes simply because they were not good enough or they have a bruise.

This food was distributed for free to the needy. In 2000, the Northern Illinois Food Bank has made a deal with the JEWEL-OSCO food store to collect the food they are unable to sell.

Today, the program has grown to include 11 different retailers and 182 stores, including Costco, Cub, Food 4 Less, Hilander, Kroger, Mariano’s Fresh Market, Meijer, Sam’s Club, Target and Walmart.