Home couches discovered to contain extremely toxic chemicals

Couch illustration 
By: Devansh Dutt 

(Scroll down for video) Scientists discovered that many home couches contain an extremely toxic chemical, according to recent press reports.

Many home sofas contain potentially toxic flame retardants, scientists have warned.

Heather Stapleton and his colleagues explained that many U.S. manufacturers adhere to the California flammability standard called "Technical Bulletin 117," and the use of flame retardants in residential furniture.

The standard that was implemented in 1975, focused on saving lives by protecting against home fires started by candles, matches and other small flames.

The investigation indicated that the flame retardant foam can migrate to house dust for people and pets. Other research related to flame retardants show adverse health effects.

Stapleton’s team set out to gather information that consumers often lack, including sofas containing
flame retardants and what kind of chemicals are in the mix. The researchers analyzed 102 samples of residential foam filled sofas and found that most manufacturers or about 85 percent, are using flame retardants in their sofas in comparison with the past.

For sofas purchased in the last seven years, 93 percent contained flame retardants. More than half of the sofas contain flame retardants that are unchecked or have increased health problems, including "Tris," which is considered a probable human carcinogen based on animal studies and was removed from use in pajamas in 1977.