2 children discover 13,000-year-old bone

Eric Stamatin and Andrew Gainariu with the bone 
By: Sanvi Rizvi 

Two ordinary children accidentally stumbled upon an extraordinary discovery, according to press reports.

Eric Stamatin and Andrew Gainariu, were doing what other 11-year-old children do, fishing, catching crayfish, and gathering sticks and stones to build a dam on a creek near their home in Michigan.

Then, the two children stumbled upon something that most little children only dream of. They discovered a 13,000 to 14,000 American mastodon bone.

"I thought it was a strange stone," Eric said this week from his Shelby Township home in suburban Detroit, near where the bone was found in a stream.

His cousin Andrew, who lives in Troy, was visiting at the time, said that he knew immediately that it was
an animal bone, something Eric's father, a doctor of internal medicine, confirmed.

"I thought it was a dinosaur bone," Andrew said.

The guys were geeked after John Zawiskie, a geologist at the Cranbrook Institute of Science, identified the discovery as a shaft or neck bone of a mastodon, an elephant-like animal that became extinct between 10,000 and 11,000 years ago.

"We are very excited," Eric said. "This does not happen to ordinary 11-year-old children to find a bone in a stream. It's pretty incredible."