Up to 29 percent horsemeat used in some beefburgers in England (video)

Man eating burger illustration 
By: Wayne Morin 

(Scroll down for video) People are outraged after it was discovered that meat sold as beefburgers were actually up to 29 percent horsemeat, according to press reports in London.

British Prime Minister David Cameron on Wednesday, expressed concern over the extremely worrying discovery of horsemeat in beefburgers sold in giant supermarkets.

The Food Safety Authority of Ireland or FSAI, said on Tuesday, that up to 29 percent of the content of some beefburger meat was in fact horsemeat, while also finding pig DNA.

The frozen patties were sold in supermarket chains like Tesco and Iceland, in Britain and Ireland, and in Irish branches of Lidl, Aldi and Dunnes Stores. Tesco is the largest supermarket retailer in Britain.

The FSAI said the beefburgers were processed in two processing plants in Ireland, and one in Northern England.

Simon Coveney, Ireland's agriculture and food minister, said that the source of the problem seems to be the products imported from the Netherlands and Spain.

While horsemeat is a common sight in central Asia, China, Latin America, and parts of Europe, it is considered taboo by the British and Irish consumers.

Of the 27 FSAI products tested, 10 were found to contain horse DNA and 23 contained pig DNA. In nine of the 10, horsemeat represented 0.3 percent or less of the meat content.

However, it did make up 29.1 percent of the meat content of the Everyday Low Tesco Value Range Beefburgers.
Cameron told parliament in London, that it was a very serious matter.

"People in our country have been very concerned to read this morning, that when they thought they were buying beefburgers they were buying something that had horsemeat in it," he said.

"It's a very disturbing news,” he added.